Diabetes

The Truth about Diabetes

Many people feel anxious and confused when they hear they have diabetes.  They start reading about it in brochures, books and on websites. Family, friends and neighbors offer advice.  All these opinions may leave them more confused. 

Here are some truths about diabetes:

Certified Diabetes Educator

Q. I'm struggling to control my blood pressure, diabetes, and weight - what can I do?

Like most Americans, you probably do not sleep the 7-9 hours each night that the National Sleep Foundation recommends. It is also safe to assume that you have, or know someone who has, one or more of the leading causes of death in the US according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) including heart disease, cancer, chronic respiratory disease (such as COPD), or diabetes; all of which are affected negatively by an undiagnosed or untreated sleep disorder.

Sleep Technologist

Diabetes Care at WCH

“Nearly 26 million Americans suffer from diabetes, and a third of those don’t even realize it,” said Carol Inkrott, dietitian and certified diabetes educator at Wooster Community Hospital. Another 79 million have prediabetes, a condition that not only puts them at risk of developing full-blown diabetes but also signifies that damage to blood vessels and nerves has already begun.

Q: Can a foot examination reveal Peripheral Arterial Disease (PAD)?

A: Podiatrists have the ability to discover indications of PAD in a foot exam before serious problems occur. PAD is a narrowing or clogging of arteries in the legs caused by plaque. Due to the blocking of blood vessels in the legs, patients with PAD are more prone to foot complications. Cuts, sores, or blisters will be slow to heal due to the lack of blood flow. Early signs of PAD and diabetes can be detected. It is important that pain in the feet and legs not be ignored, but rather discussed with your podiatrist.

Common signs of PAD include:

Podiatrist

Fall Community Newsletter

Philip Hostetler likes to joke that heart catheterizations "run in the family."  After all, his grandfather, father and brother have all undergone this procedure.  So it didn't come as a complete surprise when, after experiencing some heart arrhythmia this spring, his cardiologist ordered one for him as well.

Dr. Cyril Ofori mentioned there was a new catheterization procedure he might be a condidate for called radial artery catheterization.  Hostetler jumped at the chance.  "I was all over it.  Let me try it," said Hostetler.

Diabetes in Motion - Exercise Options Near You

The Diabetes Support Group at Wooster Community Hospital will host the free program “Diabetes in Motion – Exercise Options Near You” in the hospital auditorium on Monday, August 20th, from 6:00-7:00 p.m. A panel of exercise specialists from our area will discuss walking and biking paths, Silver Sneakers, options for those with physical limitations, and ideas for exercising alone or in a group.

In addition to Dawn McClure, who teaches exercise classes at Wooster Community Hospital’s HealthPoint facility, the panel will include:

My father and I have diabetes. I've heard about programs where we can learn how to manage our diabetes. Will Medicare cover this for Dad? Will my insurance cover it?

Q. My father and I have diabetes. I've heard about programs where we can learn how to manage our diabetes. Will Medicare cover this for Dad? Will my insurance cover it?

A. It sounds like you have heard about Diabetes Self-Management Training (DSMT). These programs help patients discover how to live safely with diabetes day by day. They learn about balanced eating, exercise, foot care, blood sugar testing, and much more.

The American Diabetes Association urges everyone with diabetes to attend DSMT.

Certified Diabetes Educator

Diabetes on Vacation - Eat Well, Travel Well

The Diabetes Support Group at Wooster Community Hospital will host the free program “Diabetes on Vacation – Eat Well, Travel Well” in the hospital auditorium on Monday, June 18th, from 6:00-7:00 p.m.

As we enter the summer, our vacation and travel plans can make managing diabetes more difficult. It is possible to eat well and travel well with diabetes, however. Join us as Carol Inkrott, RD, LD, Certified Diabetes Educator shares tips and lessons with us. Bring your own ideas and suggestions, and be prepared to share and learn together!

I'm caring for my grandmother who is diabetic and doesn't move around much. How do I prevent bed sores?

Q. I'm caring for my grandmother who is diabetic and doesn't move around much. How do I prevent bed sores?

A. This can be challenging, but there are some things you can do:

Pay attention to her overall health: People with chronic wounds often have other underlying conditions such as diabetes, peripheral arterial disease, vascular disease or radiation injuries.

Program Director, The Hyperbaric Medicine and Wound Healing Center at Wooster Community Hospital

Weigh Your Health

In the United States, overweight and obesity among all groups—particularly children and adolescents—have greatly increased over the past quarter century. Excess weight has become an epidemic, causing serious health problems for millions of people.

Obesity is the accumulation of excessive body fat. It is defined by a measure called “body mass index” or BMI. BMI is calculated using this equation: BMI = your weight in pounds divided by your height in inches squared, multiplied by 703.

Wooster Family Medicine