Sleep Disorder

Q. I'm struggling to control my blood pressure, diabetes, and weight - what can I do?

Like most Americans, you probably do not sleep the 7-9 hours each night that the National Sleep Foundation recommends. It is also safe to assume that you have, or know someone who has, one or more of the leading causes of death in the US according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) including heart disease, cancer, chronic respiratory disease (such as COPD), or diabetes; all of which are affected negatively by an undiagnosed or untreated sleep disorder.

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Q. My husband works long days and I worry about him driving home tired. What are his risks?

A. Studies have shown that drowsiness effects result in slower reaction times, impaired judgment and vision, decline in attention to important signs, road changes, and the actions of other vehicles, decreased alertness, which can prevent someone from seeing an obstacle and avoiding a crash, increased moodiness and aggressive behavior, problems with processing information and short-term memory, microsleeping, which are brief two-thirds of a second sleep episodes. Drowsy driving claims many lives and injures thousands of Americans each year.

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Q. I am tired all the time and a co-worker says a lack of sleep can cause more serious health problems later in life, is this true?

A. Getting the proper amount of sleep is essential to your physical health and emotional well-being and is just as important to the body as food and water. Sleep needs change over a person’s lifetime. Children and adolescents need more sleep than adults, typically 10-11 hours, while adults need 7-9 hours of sleep per night.

Sleep Technologist
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